Feel Like You Were Born into the Wrong Family? See If You Were Adopted

Author: PeopleFinders on October 5th, 2018
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Lots of people go through a phase of feeling like they just don’t fit in. But for some, this feeling has persisted throughout most of their life. That’s because they feel like they are completely different from their family.

The differences can be little things like you enjoying classical music while your family can’t stand it. Or your outward appearance doesn’t resemble anyone in your household. Maybe you’ve overheard conversations between family members that leave you questioning your origins.

It’s important to know that your desire to learn more is normal. Wanting to know your roots can seem to some as a betrayal to their family, but this isn’t the case. The majority of people who have been adopted want to understand more about their personal histories and backgrounds. Studies have even proven that this knowledge is important to an adoptee’s well-being.

You can find out more about your own personal origins with a simple online records search. PeopleFinders.com can comb through millions of public records to get you the info you need to learn more about your past. Here are a few tips on how you can get started on getting to know yourself better.

Start with General Information

Sometimes, the best place to start is at the source. Speaking to friends and family members about your origins can be difficult. Be considerate when talking about these things with your loved ones. Parents may feel defensive or hurt if the statements you ask are too straightforward. Start with something like, “Can you tell me more about where I come from?”. This basic question lets them decide how to begin a discussion they’ve probably waited a long time to have.

Getting Outside Help

If your adoptive parents seem hesitant to speak with you about these matters, it can be useful to get some outside help. This can come in the form of support from friends and other relatives that are adopted and may have dealt with similar situations. These family members can be valuable sources of insight. Just ask them how they learned they were adopted and what they did to find more.

Online databases made available to the public can be another great resource. You can start to gather more in-depth information about your past using a public records search by name. This way you can look through birth records, census data, property records, and more.

What to Expect from a Public Records Search

In the past, gaining access to birth records and other adoptive information could mean overcoming lots of red tape and legalities. Fortunately, many states today are making retrieving these vital records much easier. So, what kind of info can you expect to find when you conduct a free public records search? The answer is it that it can vary. Using just your name, you may be able to locate your original birth certificate, biological relatives, even adoptive records. Details listed in adoptive records are usually broken into two separate categories: non-identifying and identifying information.

Depending on how exhaustive your public records search is and your birth state’s statutes, you can expect the categories to include the following data:

Non-identifying Information

  • Date and place of the adopted person’s birth
  • Age of the birth parents and general physical description, such as eye and hair color
  • Race, ethnicity, religion, and medical history of the birth parents
  • Educational level of the birth parents
  • Reason for placing the child up for adoption
  • Existence of other children born to birth parents

Identifying Information

  • Positive identification of birth parents
  • Current or past names of the person
  • Addresses
  • Employment records

Are you ready to discover more about your past? PeopleFinders is your go-to source for all types of public records including birth records, marriages, divorces, census data, and more. Get started with your free public records search today!

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