Month: May 2010

A Year Of Anyone, Anywhere

On Saturday, May 29 2010, this blog – Anyone, Anywhere – celebrates its one-year anniversary! What a year it’s been! We’ve covered a vast array of topics, brought up ideas on how PeopleFinders can make your life easier and enjoyed reading some opinionated comments from you. A few of our favorite moments include:

Lessons From National Missing Children’s Day

Nearly 800,000 children are reported missing in the United States every year. Many are abducted by family members; others are taken by violent predators and sex offenders. This is an ongoing problem that affects us all. May 25, 2010 is National Missing Children’s Day. It’s a chance to reflect on the widespread problem of child Read More…

Jennifer Schuett’s Attacker Commits Suicide

When Jennifer Schuett was only 8-years-old she was kidnapped by Dennis Earl Bradford. The young girl was raped, dragged into the middle of a field and left to die. Once she was certain the man was gone, Jennifer tried to call for help, but couldn’t. Her abductor had slit her throat. Jennifer was lucky to Read More…

The Supreme Court Makes A Decision About Sex Offenders

On Monday, May 17 2010, the Supreme Court declared Civil Commitment for sex offenders to be legal. This means the federal government may now hold sexual offenders indefinitely. The concept of Civil Commitment was established by the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006. Adam Walsh was abducted and murdered by a man Read More…

What You Should Know Before Dealing With Strangers Online

Have you ever responded to an ad on a public forum website? Most of us have made a purchase, unloaded unwanted merchandise or contacted someone at least once after reading a post online. It’s a wonderful system. People can make transactions with eager buyers or sellers in any city. Individuals offering jobs or looking for Read More…

Who Shares Your Name?

You may be a unique and inimitable individual, but chances are your name can’t make the same boast. Some names are far more common than others, but most everyone has to share their moniker. Have you ever wondered about your “name doppelganger?” A man named Wes Moore did. What he found was startling.